What Darwin Never Knew

Hey everyone!

While watching the documentary on Darwin, it crossed my mind that there is nothing in science that can be quantified as that groundbreaking and history altering as his discovery of evolution. Things since then have included landing on the moon, the curing of disease and electricity. But none of those have come about through strong adversity at times when the world would have dismissed the ideas as lunacy.

It’s amazing to think that one man noticed the smallest detail in a bird, a detail that existed in similar ways in every animal through time. And that once he saw that one detail thats all he could see. That brings me to the point that after seeing the documentary it was the only thing I could see too. I was sitting at chipotle the next day when a finch jumped up on my table. I can’t be 100% sure that it was a finch but from what i had seen the day before it looked very similar. So I took an interest and noticed that the bird that was in front of me had a short wide beak very similar to one of the types of birds that Darwin observed in his journeys. This would make sense in that the short beak finches were so because of their need to crack seeds. This was almost instantly supported when one of the birds picked up a piece of corn off of the ground to eat. The reason theta the finches in this area have short beaks is because they have an a bun dance of options for food and do not need ling beaks to gather pollen out of flowers.

below i have a map showing the migration of finches over time to the state of florida

(image from wikipedia)

finch copy

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