Curiosities of the Sea Urchin

I’ve been exposed to a lot of marine life growing up as a child. Back in Brazil, my family and I owned a small apartment close to a very popular beach in Guarujá called Praia da Enseada. There was a good aquarium close by and every time we traveled down to our beach apartment, we would go to the aquarium. My favorite part of the venue was the interactive part where we got to touch little sea creatures such as starfish, anemones, and sea urchins. For some reason, I was never too interested in the Sea Urchin and couldn’t understand it how it could move or eat or be an animal at all.

The trip that we took with the Biodiversity group to Lido Park helped clarify in my head what sea urchins are and how they live. We picked up a broken urchin and the professor passed it around. I got to see something I have never seen before, and this may sound extremely dumb to many people, but I finally saw the mouth of a Sea Urchin for the first time and I finally understood it how it could be an animal.

So I did some research after it on my own and came up with very interesting findings and pictures.

The live cycle of a Sea urchin: http://www.planktonchronicles.org/en/episode/sea-urchin-planktonic-origins

10 things you may not know about Sea Urchins:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oljZbs5haaY

Sea Urchin Wiki Page:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_urchin#Anatomy

There are people who eat Sea Urchins in various different ways. An extreme is eating them alive in a form of sushi.

There are over 700 species of Sea urchins in the world. Sea Urchins are good animals to indicate climate change and water quality. Scientists are looking more into the Sea urchin to research climate change since they seem to react to these changes sooner than other sea animals. They can also live up to 200 years and they have no brain, only a nervous system that helps them move about on the ocean floor.

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Sea Urchin Larvae: Picture http://www.scienceasart.org/size-manipulated-sea-urchin-larvae

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Diagram of an adult Sea Urchin Picture: http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/292/7/c/s__droebachiensis___the_green_sea_urchin_by_abiogenisis-d6r0uoy.jpg

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