A Dark Take On A Dark Topic

An activist fastens his signature written on dolphin-shaped origami on a banner, in protest against the annual slaughter of dolphins in the fishing village of Taiji in Japan, in front of the Japanese embassy in San Jose August 31, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

An activist fastens his signature written on dolphin-shaped origami on a banner, in protest against the annual slaughter of dolphins in the fishing village of Taiji in Japan, in front of the Japanese embassy in San Jose August 31, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate http://www.fashiontimes.com/articles/2094/20140121/japan-dolphin-hunt.htm

 

WARNING: This post is based solely on my views and opinions on the award winning documentary, The Cove. It is a dark take.

My first reactions to The Cove, when I first watched it about a year ago, was utter shock. It was very hard for me to believe such a large scale massacre was occurring in such well known country of the world. I felt very sad, and pitied for the animals, but most of all I felt useless. Nothing I did would really make a difference. A year later, re watching this movie. My feelings and thoughts towards this issue sort of changed. I still believe that this is an issue that should be approached and I think it’s wrong, but only to some degree.

To be honest, the second time I saw The Cove, I thought about The Holocaust. There is a very several grand distinctions between the two but it was a solid comparison when you came to the main arguments. The Japanese argue that they do not see what was so special about dolphins to begin with. This is a good comparison to the way Nazi Germany was Jews. Neither party thought about their victims as significant. Focusing on the Japanese towards the dolphins, there’s some truth to that. Dolphins are seen as special because of the pedestal the human race has put them on. Yes, they are incredibly smart, but so are many different animals (elephants, gorillas, turtles, sharks, whales, crows, etc…). The main difference lies on the entertainment value we have given them. The fact that this is such a big issue when dolphins aren’t even an endangered species could back up this opinion.

Another observation that I found quite interesting was the comparison between dolphins and cows. The Japanese can eat dolphin – falsely advertised – and get entertained by dolphins at the same time. Well we can watch a rodeo and eat a burger at the same time. The differences between the two include the inability to farm dolphins and the lack of entertainment value and sentiment in cows.

I’m not saying the dolphin slaughter is a good thing, but I feel both parties are being slightly hypocritical. On one hand, we say that dolphin slaughter is wrong yet support the torture they undergo in aquariums and other entertainment establishments. On the other hand, the Japanese defend the issue swearing by tradition and ignorance, but they hide the issue from the public. I believe that you shouldn’t hide something you believe to be right despite what society might think, regardless of the topic or issue at hand.

 

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3 thoughts on “A Dark Take On A Dark Topic

  1. i agree they shouldn’t hide what they are doing if they think its right. especially if it is a cultural thing, then why hide it from their own people?

  2. You raise some really interesting points! I’m not sure the Holocaust comparison is entirely sound, because humans don’t kill other humans just because they’re “not special” — any oppressed racial/ethnic/religious group will be extensively painted as evil or responsible for societal ills to justify what is done to them. I mean, the Japanese did blame dolphins for loss of fish in the ocean, but I don’t know if that’s comparable.

    I also think we romanticize animals we can’t domesticate or don’t see very often. Cows become dumb livestock, while dolphins are beautiful and free and majestic, because we can’t control them. Really, that’s the only difference — cows are very cute, and they can even have best friends (at least according to a Cracked article I read.) Maybe people in Japan have a more casual attitude towards dolphins because they see more dolphins, so they don’t seem as special.

    P.S. I hope it doesn’t seem like I’m picking on you in discussions, you just always say things that make me think so I feel a need to respond. 🙂 It’s not meant in a negative way at all.

  3. cultural differences are so evident some times like what you said about the rodeo and the burger! back home they have cockfights and the looser usually ends up in somebody’s plate…

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