Industrial Beekeeping

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After watching the documentary last class, I began to really become curious about the concept of “industralized beekeeping”. In all honesty, I had no idea that bees had become industrialized because I wasn’t aware that they could be used in such a manner. However, with information compiled from the internet and new information from the documentary, the truth has become evident to me.

Apparently, “75% of all the bee colonies in the nation are trucked to California to pollinate almonds early in the year.” And, to top it off, with the introduction of Colony Collapse Disorder the number of American bees for transport is dropping; thus, the missing bees are being replaced by bees outsourced from places like China and Australia. In many ways, this is injurious to our native bee population because it seems to permit an attitude that the lives of the American bees do not matter and are replaceable. Not only that, but “multinational business capacity is clearly destroying the system.”

After reading quite a bit on the issue, it seems as though there needs to be a return back to beekeeping being on a smaller scale (not trucking thousands upon thousands of bees all over). Bees are living creatures that form highly specialized colonies and communities, which seemed to be highly disrupted by these forced migrations. Judging by the information in the article I am sourcing for this post in particular, and that of the film, it seems as though industrialized agriculture will be the downfall of the American bee (let alone bees of many other nations). I know that I will continue to buy local, raw honey. However, I worry that my contributions against industrialized beekeeping will not be enough to make this system change.

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3 thoughts on “Industrial Beekeeping

  1. That is insane that so many bees are transported and shipped around like that! Makes you think that we probably should be paying more attention to them.

  2. Pingback: How Can I Start Beekeeping? A Guide for Beginners | Langstroth's Hive

  3. Pingback: Fancy Bee Keeping? Run It As A Business | Langstroth's Hive

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